The Reason

The Rolex Submariner originally designed in 1953 is one of the most iconic of the Rolex models, and of all wristwatches ever made.


A fully detailed deconstruction will be available to be downloaded in the coming months in book format. To be informed of when it will be ready please subscribe to the newsletter here.

 Utilitarian military style white on black aesthetic.

Utilitarian military style white on black aesthetic.

 Personalised case back engraving

Personalised case back engraving

The Submariner photographed has been worn consistently since 2014, the case is both tarnished and worn as a result. 

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Movement Automatic   Diameter:28.50    Jewels:31   Power Reserve:48    Frequency:28800


Case features


The first views of the calibre once the case back is removed.

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The movement is held in the case through the tension created by two screws pushing the movement down towards the bezel. To remove the mvt, the stem is first removed and the screws loosened so as to allow the mvt to be turned until the screws aline with a cut out in the case which frees the screws and the mvt to be extracted.


The stem is released by pushing on the button in the centre of the image.

 The button is part of the setting lever on the under side of the mvt holding the stem in place and linking to the setting mechanism.

The button is part of the setting lever on the under side of the mvt holding the stem in place and linking to the setting mechanism.


The crown tube is screwed into the centre of the case with a star shaped key. Inside the tube is a further rubber seal.

The triple lock crown screws down onto a tube which has seals on the inside and well as a seal on the outer surface. There is also a seal on the bottom of the inner surface of the winding crown.

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Once the movement is removed from the case the stem is then returned to the mvt for dismantling.

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Multiple views of the assembled calibre removed from the case.

The large pipes on the hands and large distances between them lends to a strong construction aligned with the role of a divers watch.

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Hands removed

The rear of the dial


The polished white gold hands

The mvt removed from the case before deconstruction.

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The Breguet over-coil balance spring

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The balance spring clamped into the stud holder

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 Movement with automatic block removed

Movement with automatic block removed

 Balance wheel guard

Balance wheel guard

Circular grained train wheels

Top view of balance and cock

 Underside of balance and cock

Underside of balance and cock

The fully assembled automatic block, removed from the mvt.

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Underside of the movement, normally hidden by the dial.

The disc above covers the underside of the mainplate and forms a seat for the dial. It is probably added to assure the mvt sits in the centre of the case.

 The mvt with the disc removed

The mvt with the disc removed

Finished with large circular spotting

 The disc set on the mvt is held in place with 4 blued screws

The disc set on the mvt is held in place with 4 blued screws

 The setting mechanism

The setting mechanism

 Etched on the inside of the bezel

Etched on the inside of the bezel


A fully detailed deconstruction will be available to be downloaded in the coming months in book format. To be informed of when it will be ready please subscribe to the newsletter here.

To learn more about Rolex www.rolex.com